Blogs, Sports

Failure to Monitor: The Death of Dallas

Welcome back to Failure to Monitor. The series about the NCAA, and how they’ve been shaped by scandal. Last time, we talked about the case of Board of Regents v. NCAA, where the Supreme Court ruled that the organization had breached the Sherman Antitrust Act, opening the floodgates for money to pour into individual schools. Once that line was crossed, the member schools didn’t look back. Big time programs started flaunting their wealth in the face of the NCAA by brazenly paying players and recruits outrageous amounts of money. Nowhere was this more prevalent than in the old Southwest Conference. One school decided to go even further than the rest, and the NCAA saw an opportunity to take the power back. Continue reading

Blogs, Sports

Football Is For the Fans. For Now…

On Sunday night, twelve of the biggest teams in European soccer announced that they would be breaking away from the current Champions League and forming their own Super League. The new venture would operate exactly the same as the current setup but with one key difference: the founding members would automatically qualify every year. Instead of having to earn a spot through success in their domestic leagues, the biggest brands in soccer would now be guaranteed a seat at the $6 billion table. Two days later, it looks like the league is already dead. Continue reading

Blogs, Sports

Failure to Monitor: Tark the Shark

Welcome back to Failure to Monitor. When we left off last time, the NCAA national office had established absolute control over the member schools. They gained the power to shut down entire programs if they saw fit. For the next few decades, they retained this power unchallenged. They punished schools for cheating, and the schools accepted it blindly. The 1970s, however, were a different story. Continue reading

Blogs, Sports

Failure to Monitor: Bluegrass Bluff

Welcome back to Failure to Monitor, the series about the NCAA and how they’ve been shaped by scandal. Last week, we took a look at the origins of the NCAA, and how the modern organization functions. We saw that it was born out of necessity and that their authority comes from the precedents they set. Today, I’m going to tell you about the first chance they got to set a major precedent. While the first few years of the NCAA’s existence were relatively quiet, the scandals came in fast and hard in the 1950s. And although they doled out punishments to multiple schools,  one in particular set the tone for the future: the University of Kentucky. Continue reading

Blogs, Sports

Failure to Monitor: The Founding

Welcome back to Failure to Monitor, a series about the NCAA, and how its sordid past shaped what it is today. Before we can talk about its past, we obviously have to talk about what the organization is, and how it started. Because with the NCAA, the scandals go back to day one. So join me, as I give you a brief overview of how the NCAA works, and how it started on its path towards domination. Continue reading

Blogs, Sports

Introducing a New Series: Failure to Monitor

So, one of my assignments for my audio production class is to create a podcast series, with an emphasis on the production and mixing involved. I of course chose to talk about college sports and the NCAA, so I’ve gone all-in on it. But it’s an intro class, meaning the mixing is definitely not professional quality. So, in the interest of protecting your ears, I decided to adapt it into a blog series as well. For the next 10 weeks, I’ll be posting my new series: Failure to Monitor. Continue reading

Blogs, Sports

The NBA’s Treadmill of Mediocrity is Getting Crowded

If you asked any casual fan what topic has defined the NBA over the past few years you’d probably get one of two answers: super-teams and tanking. Teams are either stockpiling superstars like they’re toilet paper at the start of quarantine, or they’re hoping nobody will notice that they’ve been playing Shelvin Mack 23 minutes a game. This race to the top/bottom means that the true losers are the teams stuck in the middle. And thus, the “treadmill of mediocrity” was born. Continue reading